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HOW TO Guide

How To with pets


WELCOME  TO  GHANA !

HOW TO WITH PETS

Importing your pet
Caring for your pet while in Ghana
(Shops, training centres and veterinarians)
Exporting your pet from Ghana
Recommendations

While in Ghana
Testimonials
General article


Please note that many of the following providers are offering multiple services and goods for pets.

 


Importing your pet in Ghana

Being away from your original country can be hard and you don't want to make it any harder by leaving your pet home.

What you have to do is to follow the Ghana registration process for importing your pet. The requirements are:
- Import application form
- Import permit which is valid for a period of 4 weeks only (was 8 weeks before)
- Rabies vaccination at least 30 days prior to travel but less than 12 months
- Blood tests are needed for dogs but not for cats and are valid for 30 days
- Copy of the Rabies Certificate to be included for endorsement
- Proof of vaccinations for Canine distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus, Leptospira Canicola and Leptospira Icterohaemorrhagiae and Para Influenza are also required
- Negative results of tests for Brucella Canis and other conditions must be shown
- A USDA (or CFIA) accredited veterinarian must then complete a Veterinary Certificate for Ghana for endorsement by the USDA or CFIA if travelling from the United States or Canada. If you are not travelling from either of these countries, the Governing Authority of your country responsible for the import and export of animals should endorse the forms
- "fit for travel" certificate which you need for the Airline as well
- pet passport for your dog to enter Ghana

The pets must be free of any infectious diseases at least six months prior to departure.

Your Ghana pet passport is verified at the time of order.

There are no refunds on pet immigration forms unless there is a problem with the information or forms provided.

Other Passport Forms & Pet Travel Equipment:
Pet Passports - All Countries
Pet Policies - All Major Airlines
Pet Crates - IATA Compliant
Pet Carriers - Airline Compliant

Assistance for import (and export) of pets
- The Vet's Place 10 Agostino Neto Road, Airport Residential Area - 0289 530 313 / 0302 766 920 / 0208 131 369 (Dr. Tettey) info@thevetsplaceghana.com - thevetsplace@gmail.com
- Worldwide Movers is an IPATA accredited pet moving company - 0302 971 258 (Grant & Helen Jones)
- Dennis of Mayden Veterinary Services has been providing import and export services of pets across the globe and is a also a member of the International Pet and Animals Transport Association (IPATA) - maydenveterinaryservices@gmail.com
- Isaac imports pets into Ghana - 0240 244 007

Shops

SAS Ghana Ltd. 10 Agostino Neto Road Airport Residential Area (opposite Chinese Embassy) - 0303 936 503 info@sasaccra.com
Phoenix Animal Care Osu Badu Street, Dzorwulu. Near UBA Bank, opposite the Soccer field - including professional grooming and crates that meet IATA and airline requirements - 0246 631 566 / 0507 040 555
Roni's Kennels Mile7, Achimota, East Legon, Adabraka, Dome, Spintex, Osu, Awudome - Dog foods, accessories, grooming, training - 0266 233 030 / 0241 976 969 / 0246 442 442Doggie Dog World Dansoman main roundabout, opposite MDS Lancet laboratory - 0244 361 966 / 0235 361 966 info@doggiedogworldgh.com - doggiedogworlddc@gmail.com
Maxmart shopping centre (37) 37 Liberation Road, opposite Golden Tulip Hotel Airport City Accra - 0302 783 750
Maxmart shopping centre (A&C mall – East Legon) - 0302 518 881 / 0289 225 927
Palace, Game and Koala in Accra and Kumasi have pet supplies.

Dog training centres

Ken - 0249 325 325. Very good trainer. A couple of years ago, a pet owner shared that Ken had become too unreliable, taking on more clients than he can cope with
Peter - 0279 068 619 from K9 Services but his experience is mainly training dogs for British police
Kenith - 0244 769 254
Abdey­az kennels 127 Southwest Marchathy Hill, Weija. Dog boarding and training, guard dogs services, dog food production - 0243 285 588
Petwelfarerus Pet sales Kotobabi. Vet service, grooming, training, crossing, food drugs and accessories sale and unique pet issues  - 0266 677 261
Roni's Kennels Mile7, Achimota, East Legon, Adabraka, Dome, Spintex, Osu, Awudome - 0246 442 442 / 0266 233 030 / 0241 976 969

Veterinarians

Accra

The Vet's Place 10 Agostino Neto Road, Airport Residential Area - 0289 530 313 / 0302 766 920 / 0208 131 369 info@thevetsplaceghana.com
Marivet Veterinary Centre Roman Ridge Shopping Centre, 9 Sir Arku Korsah St., Airport Residential Area - 0244 281 952
Dr. David Rogers 37 Vet, next door to El Wak stadium, North Cantonments - recently did a year long course in UK - does house calls - 0231 185 207
Ofankor Veterinary Clinic Ofanko, on the Achimota/ Kumasi highway, Achimota - 0302 404 142 / 0208 179 558 / 0277 578 329
Drushba Veterinary Dodowa Road, Adenta - 0302 404 142 / 0208 179 558 / 0277 578 329 fotoninga@yahoo.co.uk
Perfect Veterinary Services 20 Osu Badu St., opp. Palace Chinese Restaurant, Dzorwulu - 0244 582 775 donkorvero@yahoo.com
Dr. Daniel Sackey East Legon - 0244 689 085 / 0208 249 302 ddsackey@yahoo.com
Dr. G. Opoko-Pare 57 4th Circular Rd., East Cantonments - 0302 775 639 / 0302 777 773 / 0244 314 473
Tesano above Zoo Zoo restaurant, Abeka Plaza close to the Total station - has crates - Edna 0208 181 751
Dr. Asare - does house calls - 0262 027 003
Labadi Veterinary Surgery - 0244 860 406/ 0243 432 966
La Veterinary Hospital Kosher St., behind Jokers Restaurant, La - 0302 769 061 / 0244 282 166 / 0244 341 218 jamakyeanim@gmail.com
Beach Road Animal Hospital Beach Road (near police barrier), Nungua - 0302 716 777 / 0277 540 608 / 0302 716 805 / 0277 401 879

Tema

Frasier Street, Community Seven - 0208 193 628
Dr. Andy at DevtracoEstate com 25; his clinic is next to Datus at Community 7 - 0208 193 628

Kumasi

Dr. Dickson Dei - 0244 809 339
Amakom Veterinary Department next to Kumasi Technical Institute
Catena Veterinary Hospital - 0244 463 435


Exportation

Whether you brought your pet with you or bought one in Ghana, you do not want to be among the expatriates who abandon their pets when relocating.
You only have to be sure that you have all the documents required by the country you are moving to before exporting your pet.

- Your pet will need several injections from your local vet (check which ones and the minimum delay requirements of the destination country) and also a microchip
- All paperwork should be signed by the vet
- Apply for an Export permit- You need to have a result from a recognised laboratory that the antibody level for rabies is high enough
- Health certificate and also blood tests to prove they have no parasites and that's to get out of Ghana
- The blood sample needs to be tested by a recognised laboratory according to the "Pet travel scheme" and a corresponding report / certificate needs to be issued
- You need an international certificate for the anti rabies vaccination if you want to bring the dog to the US or EuropePet passport
- Cage for pet.

Dogs Screwworm Policy - The USDA pet import policy allows dogs from screwworm affected countries to enter the country if the following requirements are met:

1. Health certificate issued prior to the flight needs to state that the dog(s) were inspected for screwworm within 5 days preceding shipment to the U.S. and dog(s) were found free of screwworm  OR
2. Dog(s) found infested with screwworm, are held in quarantine, treat until free prior to leave the country.

For export to the UK, see here. To the USA, see here.


Recommendations

Whether to import or export, always plan well ahead so you don't end up flying without your pet.

Make sure your pet gets acquainted with the kennel or container well ahead of your flight. Add some familiar toys or some of your clothing items, so your pet has a sense of familiarity during the transport. Sedation of your pet during the trip is generally not recommended and should only be used as a last resort.

Shipping your pet overseas is a quite expensive undertaking. Make sure you get reliable cost estimates before booking a flight.

If you do not travel with your pet and decide to ship it separately, it will be shipped as cargo in the pressurized cargo compartment of an airplane. Fees are assessed by the kennel’s weight, size, and by destination. Keep in mind that this option is far more expensive than traveling with your pet as checked baggage or in the cabin.

IATA (International Air Transport Association): click here to see information provide about air transportation of live animals, and here for information about travel containers for pets.

IPATA (Independent Pet and Animal Transportation Association International) is an international trade association of animal handlers, pet moving providers, kennel operators, veterinarians and others who are dedicated to the care and welfare of pets and small animals during domestic and international transport.

It is always advisable to carry some form of identification indicating ownership of the pet.

Click here to see list of countries classified as rabies-free according to many (but not all) country standards.

Click here to see list of countries classified as rabies-controlled (Third) countries (having a low incidence of rabies) by EU Standards (used in many but not all countries).

While in Ghana
Vacations

You are travelling and you want someone to look after your while you are away,
- Cousins Pet Place, boarding kennel for dogs and cats in East Legon - 0506 866 196 (Lauren Huckle)
- the Vet Place in Airport Residential Area for kennelling. 10 Agostino Neto Road Tel.: 0289 530 313 / 0302 766 920 / 0208 131 369 info@thevetsplaceghana.com
- Dennis from Mayden Veterinary Services provides short-stay lodge for dogs and other pets at his house on Spintex Road - maydenveterinaryservices@gmail.com
Home Grooming
Raymond comes by your house to groom your dog, cutting nails, hair, bathing, treating - 0243 571 765.
Advice

It is essential to de-worm your pet at least every three months. Contact a vet for a suitable regime for your pet
Communicate with other expat pet owners
Join the Expat pet owners in Ghana Facebook group.


Testimonials
"I brought in two dogs with me to Ghana a year ago and intend to take them back w/me after the conclusion of my work here. I brought them in separate kennels on a KLM flight I was on and paid excess luggage fee for each kennel (Total $400). At that time, I was informed that KLM is the only airline with a special cargo section w/controlled air to transport pets safely. KLM is extremely good with the transport of animals. They have a vet that checks the pets in Amsterdam, they walk them, etc. during the stop-over. They even allowed me to wait for my dogs to be brought to the connecting flight, so I could watch them being loaded to the plane. You can do the same going to the U.S. Please make sure to follow requirements specified on the web site below, esp. the one re: Screwworm as GH is one of the countries that has them. You just need to take them to the vet and make sure that they have all their shots, tests, etc. within specified time frame. Of course, you can always hire a pet relocation company, but it will be much more expensive and they really don't do anything different than what I described above. Hope this helps."

"I don't want to scare people, but bringing a pet from a third country in the EU is a nightmare. And I would reckon that its even worse bringing it to the UK. If requirements are not fulfilled, they might take the pet into quarantine at the passenger's cost for minimum a few weeks. This is at least the rule in Germany."

"I bought tickets for my wife and me with TAP and then a ticket for the dog which was on the same flight with us, but certainly in the freight compartment. Cost for one way Accra - Lisbon - Munich was around 300 Euro. Was the same with Lufthansa when we took him back to Ghana."

"It is advisable to let a Ghanaian do all formalities upon arrival of the dog as the people at KIA like to chop Obruni's money even though you have all the documents in place."


General article

Moving Overseas with Pets - by Volker Poelz (Living Abroad Editor)

An important issue often overlooked by people planning to relocate overseas is the question of what to do with their pets. Should you bring them with you, leave them behind with friends or family, give them up for adoption, or drop them off at the local animal shelter?

Taking a pet with you to another country is often a complicated and time-consuming process, and you should do careful research before embarking on this costly process. Before making a decision, you should ask yourself several important questions. How long will you be gone? If you are moving overseas permanently, it is definitely worth considering bringing your favorite pet(s), but if you are going overseas for a year or less, it might be better to entrust your pet to a relative or friend until you return. Your pet’s wellbeing should be your main concern when considering taking it with you. Will your pet travel well in the confines of an airplane’s cargo bay? How might it respond to sedation? How would lengthy quarantine affect it?

Before Taking your Pet Overseas
The main concern of most countries with importing/exporting pets is the potential transmission of diseases. By far the biggest concern is the spread of rabies and of Avian influenza, which can spread from birds to humans. Rabies is a particular concern for dogs, cats, and ferrets, and a certified rabies vaccination is required in most countries, sometimes even a blood titer test to make sure your pet is free of rabies. Make sure to find out if the country of your future residence requires a lengthy quarantine—which could last up to six months. The problem is not only the high cost of quarantine, but also the fact that your pet won’t be living with you during that time. In addition to strict import requirements for dogs and cats, there are widespread import restrictions for a number of other animal species that could transmit viral diseases. Among them are birds, turtles, and a number of small mammals.

To be able to take your pet abroad with you, most countries require that you get a health certificate stating that your pet is in good health and free of parasites. Many countries now require that your pet’s health certificate from your local vet is certified by a USDA veterinarian in your state. For a list of USDA veterinarians in your state, go to www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/area_offices/. Contact the appropriate consulate to get the necessary forms required for the importation of your pet. Make sure that all vaccinations are up to date and that you fulfill the documentation requirements of the country you will be moving to. This may include translation of health certificates that may need to be notarized at a foreign consulate in your home country.

Most countries of the European Union and a growing number of countries around the world now require dogs, cats, and ferrets to carry an implanted microchip transponder, which identifies them and can be linked to vaccination and health certificates you file when entering the country. Make sure you get the right microchip for the country to which you will be moving, since the radio frequencies and encryption codes vary.

Before making arrangements to take your pet with you, consider the possible health threats to your pet overseas. While pets can be protected from rabies by vaccination, there is no immunization against Avian flu and other potentially dangerous diseases or parasites that may affect the health of your pet. Natural predators, such as felines, eagles, hawks, and large snakes are another concern, especially if you will be living in a rural area overseas.

Transportation
How your pet will be transported to your new overseas residency is an important issue. Some airlines allow pets to travel in an airplane’s cabin, provided their cage is small enough to fit under your seat. While some airlines allow small birds to travel in the cabin, tropical birds such as parrots are usually not allowed in the cabin. If your pet’s cage does not fit under your seat, you will have to ship it as checked baggage, which raises a few health concerns for your pet. Since the outside air temperature also affects the temperature in the cargo bay, airlines may restrict the transportation of pets during certain times of the year. Make sure you get detailed information about the temperature and air pressure in the cargo bay before booking a flight. In general, the shorter your flight and the more direct your route, the better it will be for your pet. Airlines have special requirements for containers in the cabin and cargo bay. Make sure you get detailed information from your preferred airlines before purchasing a cage or kennel. Also keep in mind that some airlines only transport dogs and cats, while others also ship birds and other animals.

Make sure your pet gets acquainted with the kennel or container well ahead of your flight. Add some familiar toys or some of your clothing items, so your pet has a sense of familiarity during the transport. Sedation of your pet during the trip is generally not recommended and should only be used as a last resort.

Finding a pet-friendly airline is another challenge for pet owners who want to take their pet with them overseas. Virgin Atlantic (www.virgin-atlantic.com/en/us/passengerinformation/travellingwithpets/index.jsp) stands out as one of the most pet-friendly airlines, and they even have a Flying Paws Club, which entitles passengers to airline miles and gifts for their pets. Virgin Atlantic provides shipment of pets to many destinations around the globe, including to/ from the USA, London, Hong Kong, Johannesburg, Dubai, and other destinations.

If you would like to take your pet overseas, but do not have the time to figure out all the details on your own, you might want to consider a pet relocation service. This will be expensive, but you can be assured that your pet is transported in a save and professional manner.

The Cost Factor
Shipping you pet overseas is a quite expensive undertaking. Make sure you get reliable cost estimates before booking a flight. In addition to paying for the transportation of your pet, you also have to pay for the health certificate and vaccinations, as well as for the certification by a USDA veterinarian. Your certificate may also have to be translated and notarized at a consulate for additional fees. Other items you may need to purchase for your pet include a microchip transponder (around US $50) and a kennel or pet crate (between US $50-100 depending on size). Unfortunately, just like airfares, the cost of traveling with your pet on an airplane has been steadily increasing over the past few years. The cost to ship your pet 1-way to an international destination can be as low as $80 if you transport it in the cabin, and as high as several hundred dollars if you check it as baggage. Some airlines charge excess baggage fees for transporting a pet as checked baggage (based on the size and weight of the pet and kennel), while others have a fee system based on the distance traveled.

If you do not travel with your pet and decide to ship it separately, it will be shipped as cargo in the pressurized cargo compartment of an airplane. Fees are assessed by the kennel’s weight, size, and by destination. Keep in mind that this option is far more expensive than traveling with your pet as checked baggage or in the cabin.

Taking Your Pets Back Home
The repatriation of your pets is another important issue. Depending on the prevalence of rabies in the foreign country of your residence, your pet might need to be quarantined upon returning home. Cats in general are not required to have proof of rabies immunization upon reentry into the U.S., but regulations vary from state to state. Cats and dogs entering Hawaii (www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/doa_importing.htm), for example, have a mandatory quarantine, since Hawaii in the only state in the U.S. that is entirely rabies-free. Birds of U.S. origin can usually return to the USA, but they need to be quarantined at a USDA animal import center for thirty days. Importation to the USA of birds of non-U.S. origin is restricted from many countries, due to the threat of Avian influenza.

For more info
IPATA (Independent Pet and Animal Transportation Association International) is an international trade association of animal handlers, pet moving providers, kennel operators, veterinarians and others who are dedicated to the care and welfare of pets and small animals during domestic and international transport. The site provides information.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service  provides a list of countries and specific pet importation requirements (www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/) as well as pet travel tips, and animal export/ import regulations.

The United Kingdom Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs offers information about Bringing pets to the UK.

The European Union's portal web site (EUROPA) dedicated page is also a source of information on the importation of animals.

Moving Overseas with Pets

By Volker Poelzl

Living Abroad Editor

 

An important issue often overlooked by people planning to relocate overseas is the question of what to do with their pets. Should you bring them with you, leave them behind with friends or family, give them up for adoption, or drop them off at the local animal shelter?

 

Taking a pet with you to another country is often a complicated and time-consuming process, and you should do careful research before embarking on this costly process. Before making a decision, you should ask yourself several important questions. How long will you be gone? If you are moving overseas permanently, it is definitely worth considering bringing your favorite pet(s), but if you are going overseas for a year or less, it might be better to entrust your pet to a relative or friend until you return. Your pet’s wellbeing should be your main concern when considering taking it with you. Will your pet travel well in the confines of an airplane’s cargo bay? How might it respond to sedation? How would lengthy quarantine affect it?

 

Before Taking your Pet Overseas

The main concern of most countries with importing/exporting pets is the potential transmission of diseases. By far the biggest concern is the spread of rabies and of Avian influenza, which can spread from birds to humans. Rabies is a particular concern for dogs, cats, and ferrets, and a certified rabies vaccination is required in most countries, sometimes even a blood titer test to make sure your pet is free of rabies. Make sure to find out if the country of your future residence requires a lengthy quarantine—which could last up to six months. The problem is not only the high cost of quarantine, but also the fact that your pet won’t be living with you during that time. In addition to strict import requirements for dogs and cats, there are widespread import restrictions for a number of other animal species that could transmit viral diseases. Among them are birds, turtles, and a number of small mammals.

 

To be able to take your pet abroad with you, most countries require that you get a health certificate stating that your pet is in good health and free of parasites. Many countries now require that your pet’s health certificate from your local vet is certified by a USDA veterinarian in your state. For a list of USDA veterinarians in your state, go to www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/area_offices/. Contact the appropriate consulate to get the necessary forms required for the importation of your pet. Make sure that all vaccinations are up to date and that you fulfill the documentation requirements of the country you will be moving to. This may include translation of health certificates that may need to be notarized at a foreign consulate in your home country.

 

Most countries of the European Union and a growing number of countries around the world now require dogs, cats, and ferrets to carry an implanted microchip transponder, which identifies them and can be linked to vaccination and health certificates you file when entering the country. Make sure you get the right microchip for the country to which you will be moving, since the radio frequencies and encryption codes vary.

 

Before making arrangements to take your pet with you, consider the possible health threats to your pet overseas. While pets can be protected from rabies by vaccination, there is no immunization against Avian flu and other potentially dangerous diseases or parasites that may affect the health of your pet. Natural predators, such as felines, eagles, hawks, and large snakes are another concern, especially if you will be living in a rural area overseas.

 

Transportation

 

How your pet will be transported to your new overseas residency is an important issue. Some airlines allow pets to travel in an airplane’s cabin, provided their cage is small enough to fit under your seat. While some airlines allow small birds to travel in the cabin, tropical birds such as parrots are usually not allowed in the cabin. If your pet’s cage does not fit under your seat, you will have to ship it as checked baggage, which raises a few health concerns for your pet. Since the outside air temperature also affects the temperature in the cargo bay, airlines may restrict the transportation of pets during certain times of the year. Make sure you get detailed information about the temperature and air pressure in the cargo bay before booking a flight. In general, the shorter your flight and the more direct your route, the better it will be for your pet. Airlines have special requirements for containers in the cabin and cargo bay. Make sure you get detailed information from your preferred airlines before purchasing a cage or kennel. Also keep in mind that some airlines only transport dogs and cats, while others also ship birds and other animals.

 

Make sure your pet gets acquainted with the kennel or container well ahead of your flight. Add some familiar toys or some of your clothing items, so your pet has a sense of familiarity during the transport. Sedation of your pet during the trip is generally not recommended and should only be used as a last resort.

 

Finding a pet-friendly airline is another challenge for pet owners who want to take their pet with them overseas. Virgin Atlantic (www.virgin-atlantic.com/en/us/passengerinformation/travellingwithpets/index.jsp) stands out as one of the most pet-friendly airlines, and they even have a Flying Paws Club, which entitles passengers to airline miles and gifts for their pets. Virgin Atlantic provides shipment of pets to many destinations around the globe, including to/ from the USA, London, Hong Kong, Johannesburg, Dubai, and other destinations.

 

If you would like to take your pet overseas, but do not have the time to figure out all the details on your own, you might want to consider a pet relocation service. This will be expensive, but you can be assured that your pet is transported in a save and professional manner.

 

The Cost Factor

 

Shipping you pet overseas is a quite expensive undertaking. Make sure you get reliable cost estimates before booking a flight. In addition to paying for the transportation of your pet, you also have to pay for the health certificate and vaccinations, as well as for the certification by a USDA veterinarian. Your certificate may also have to be translated and notarized at a consulate for additional fees. Other items you may need to purchase for your pet include a microchip transponder (around US $50) and a kennel or pet crate (between US $50-100 depending on size). Unfortunately, just like airfares, the cost of traveling with your pet on an airplane has been steadily increasing over the past few years. The cost to ship your pet 1-way to an international destination can be as low as $80 if you transport it in the cabin, and as high as several hundred dollars if you check it as baggage. Some airlines charge excess baggage fees for transporting a pet as checked baggage (based on the size and weight of the pet and kennel), while others have a fee system based on the distance traveled.

 

If you do not travel with your pet and decide to ship it separately, it will be shipped as cargo in the pressurized cargo compartment of an airplane. Fees are assessed by the kennel’s weight, size, and by destination. Keep in mind that this option is far more expensive than traveling with your pet as checked baggage or in the cabin.

 

Taking Your Pets Back Home

The repatriation of your pets is another important issue. Depending on the prevalence of rabies in the foreign country of your residence, your pet might need to be quarantined upon returning home. Cats in general are not required to have proof of rabies immunization upon reentry into the U.S., but regulations vary from state to state. Cats and dogs entering Hawaii (www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/doa_importing.htm), for example, have a mandatory quarantine, since Hawaii in the only state in the U.S. that is entirely rabies-free. Birds of U.S. origin can usually return to the USA, but they need to be quarantined at a USDA animal import center for thirty days. Importation to the USA of birds of non-U.S. origin is restricted from many countries, due to the threat of Avian influenza.

 

For More Info

 

IATA (International Air Transport Association) provides information about air transportation of live animals (www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/live_animals/index.htm), and information about travel containers for pets (www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/live_animals/pets.htm).

 

IPATA (Independent Pet and Animal Transportation Association International) is an international trade association of animal handlers, pet moving providers, kennel operators, veterinarians and others who are dedicated to the care and welfare of pets and small animals during domestic and international transport. The site provides information about how to find a pet shipper online: www.ipata.com/page.php?rp=17.

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service  provides a list of countries and specific pet importation requirements (www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/) as well as pet travel tips (www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/pet_travel/pet_travel_tips.shtml), and animal import regulations for all 50 states (www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_import/animal_imports_states.shtml).

 

The United Kingdom Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs offers information about Bringing pets to the UK (www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/quarantine/index.htm).

 

The European Union's portal web site (EUROPA) is also a source of information on the importation of animals (europa.eu.int/comm/food/animal/liveanimals/pets/index_en.htm.

 



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